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Week 11 Story: When North Meets South

 Photo by  Ant Rozetsky  on  Unsplash Story source:  American Indian Fairy Tales  by W.T. Larned, with illustrations by John Rae (1921). A long long time ago, the winds where chaos. They had no dominion over certain land and they roamed free as they pleased. Children feared the North Wind as it was cold and brought snow and ice to their lands. The North Wind was loud and fast, and children ran and hid from it. The South Wind, however, was quite the opposite. He was just a nice guy honestly. The South Wind would walk around enjoying the sun, smelling flowers, and napping on hills. Whenever the South Wind came to town the children rejoiced.  Wherever the South Wind was traveling at that time, it was summer. The North and South balanced each other well, but the North Wind had a plan. He wanted to become more powerful than his nemesis the South Wind. The North Wind knew the South Wind's routine very well. Every night the South Wind would lay down on a hilltop, drink a beer and take a n
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Week 11 Reading Notes: Fairytales B

Photo by  Selvan B  on  Unsplash Story source:  American Indian Fairy Tales  by W.T. Larned, with illustrations by John Rae (1921). Inside old Iagoo's teepee it was warm and cheerful, even though it was cold in the forest. Iagoo broke the silence to tell a story to Eagle Feather and Morning Glory.  He told them a story of a boy who never grew to be more than three feet high. He had a sister who was much taller and stronger than him, and so she would collect food for both of them and care for him in every way. She did not realize how strange of a boy he was, and how mischievous he could be. She made her brother a bow so he could care for himself.  Winter was coming and to keep himself from freezing he needed to find a warmer garment. He tried to pluck the feathers off of birds to make a coat and keep warm, but as he shot at the birds they got scared and flew away. Each day he tried again, and when he shot 10 birds he knew he had enough. He showed his sister, proud of himself, and so

Week 11 Reading Notes: Fairytales A

Photo by  Aaron Burden  on  Unsplash Story source: American Indian Fairy Tales by W.T. Larned, with illustrations by John Rae (1921). Old Iagoo was a well known storyteller. His grandfather had told him many tales and stories that he remembered. He was a favorite of the children, he was able to make beautiful necklaces and bows and arrows. Winter is when he told his stories. The kids were scared of how loud the wind was and they asked old Iagoo if he thought the wind could hurt them. He responded that the north wind could do no hard to those who are brave and cheerful. He realized he should tell the children a story about it.  His story about the North wind began a long long time ago where there dwelt a tribe of fisherman. The land of ice stretched over the top of the world for miles. There was a limit to the wind's power, as strong as he was. He was no match for the south wind. The south wind was in the pleasant land of the sunflower. Where he dwelt, it was always summer. The sum

Week 10 Microfiction: Blackfeet Stories

  Image Source: Blackfeet Nation Land How Men and Women Discovered One Another: Men and women did not know each other long ago, the men were put in one place, and the women in another.  One day an old man was traveling and he noticed there were women. They were frightened and laid down to hide.  The old man saw them laying and assumed they were dead. One woman tricked him and used her dead weight to let her arm slap his face and make his nose bleed. They both ran and he lost them, he was very angry and this is how women found out about men.  The Smart Woman Chief: The men came to feast with the women and the women chose husbands. The old man wanted to trick the woman chief into marriage by masquerading as the chief. The woman chief had been making dried meat so her clothes were covered in blood and she was dirty.  She was refused by the old man. She went back to the camp to change into something cleaner. The old man then recognized her but she would not pay him any attention. He was so

Week 10 Reading Notes: Blackfeet

Photo by  Constantin Popp  on  Unsplash Image:  Story source: Blackfeet Indian Stories by George Bird Grinnell (1915). The Smart Woman Chief: Men and women did not know each other long ago, the men were put in one place, and the women in another. The men were made strong, but the women were not.  The women were the smartest, they knew how to craft things and create clothing.  One day an old man was traveling and he noticed there were women. The women were frightened, they didn't know what animal was trying to come to them and laid down to hide. The old man saw them laying and assumed they were dead. The woman tricked him and used her dead weight to let her arm slap his face and make his nose bleed.  They both ran and he lost them, he was very angry and this is how women found out about men. The woman chief called to the men and asked their chief if they wanted to have wives. She knew they would agree, and called them to a feast in their lodge. The women saw the men come and they w

Week 9 Story: Paradise City

  Photo by  Dennis Buchner  on  Unsplash The Story of the Man Who Did Not Wish to Die :  Japanese Fairy Tales  by Yei Theodora Ozaki, with illustrations by Japanese artists (1905). Santana was nervous, she was departing on her first ever plane trip alone! Her father had recently moved to Hawaii and she was away at college and could not visit him. She had always been afraid of heights and so when she found out her dad was moving away, she knew it was going to be hard for her to see him. He knew she was iffy about coming, he probably thought she would not. It was his 50th birthday this weekend, and she knew she had to be there.  "Sorry if I seem so nervous, I grew up in California and we just drove everywhere. Never a need to fly haha. Just don't think I am freaking out.... I am totally fine." Santana giggled nervously to the man sitting next to her on the flight. He looked over at her and noticed she was talking. Taking out an AirPod he said, "Is this going to be one

Week 9 Reading Notes: Ozaki Part B

Book Illustration The Goblin of Adachigahara Story source: Japanese Fairy Tales by Yei Theodora Ozaki Characters:  Cannibal Goblin- took the form of an old woman in Mutsu.  Priest- traveler needing a place to stay for the night Many travelers would disappear and never be heard of again. It was rumored that the place was haunted by a cannibal goblin. They whispered of the dreadful stories and did not dare to go near the dreadful spot at night. One day a buddhist pilgrim walked, and no one could warn him about the haunted spot. He was tired and needed a place to rest. He saw a cottage and stumbled over to it. He saw an old woman and called to her for a place to stay. She said she had no room to offer to him, but he insisted he would be fine sleeping on the floor. She was reluctant but said yes and offered him a poor welcome, but had rice.  The woman went out to fetch more firewood, and told the man to not make any noise and not to move at all. She told him to not go into the inner roo